Category Archives: Screening

Silent films at the Glasgow Film Festival

Faust (Murnau, 1926)
Faust (Murnau, 1926)

The schedule for the Glasgow Film Festival has just been released and as expected there are plenty of great films old and new being screened as part of the event next month. Of special interest to this blog is the Music and Film Festival strand, which comprises documentaries about music and musicians as well as films shown with live scores. Not all of the films with live musical accompaniment are silents, but of course some are – and they look very exciting.

Continue reading Silent films at the Glasgow Film Festival

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The General and The Music Box, Crystal Palace Pictures, 14 April

The General (1926)
The General (1926)

Crystal Palace Pictures is a thriving local film society, which shows a film every other Thursday on a 17ft screen in the Gipsy Hill Tavern, near Gipsy Hill station. Residents of Crystal Palace are currently embroiled in a long-running campaign for a cinema, so it’s good to see that there is an alternative in the local area. Ideally, there would be room for both, but until then, Crystal Palace Pictures is doing sterling work, showing a hugely diverse range of films.

Continue reading The General and The Music Box, Crystal Palace Pictures, 14 April

International silent film festival diary from The Bisocope

Sunrise (1927)
Sunrise (1927)

You undoubtedly know The Bisocope, an exhaustive, eloquent blog about everything related to silent film, and much more besides. If by some chance you aren’t already familiar with the site, you can expect to lose the next few hours to exploring its scholarly articles. Enjoy. However, I wanted to draw your attention to one particular post, which will definitely be of interest, and may also have the power to change your holiday plans. The Bioscope has compiled a calendar of the 2011’s silent film festivals – from Kansas to Finland. The list includes some very exciting events and all of them are worthy of your support. You can find the post here – but if you find yourself buying plane tickets, don’t blame me, blame The Bisocope.

If, on your travels, you are looking for silent film screenings outside London, let me point you towards the Nitrateville Silent Screenings forum and the US website Silents in the Court.

The Birth of a Nation, BFI Southbank, 24 January – postponed

The Birth of a Nation (1915)
The Birth of a Nation (1915)

Due to technical difficulties, the screening of The Birth of a Nation (DW Griffith, 1915) at the BFI Southbank on 24 January has been cancelled, but it will be rescheduled for later in the year. Hopefully, the rearranged screening will also benefit from an introduction from Kevin Brownlow as originally planned. Of course, we’ll pass on the details as soon we know more.

Hamlet (1920) at the BFI, 27 January – a change to the advertised programme

Asta Nielsen as Hamlet

Asta Nielsen as Hamlet, Lilly Jacobson as Ophelia in Hamlet (1920)

Look what I found tucked into my copy of Shakespeare on Silent Film: A Strange Eventful History by Robert Hamilton Ball. It’s not a “vintage” postcard, but was bought for me by relatives on holiday in Berlin when I was writing a dissertation on silent Shakespeare. Asta Nielsen as Hamlet also graces the cover of the book, and looking at these pictures again I am reminded why I am so excited about the BFI screening of Hamlet next week. I’ve not seen this 1920 film directed by Sven Gade before, as it was not available on DVD when I was at university, and it still isn’t.

The BFI screening will be a chance to see a restored print of the film, and this event was also to be the premiere of a new score by Claire van Kampen – but unfortunately, that is no longer the case. However, I’m sure that Neil Brand’s improvised piano accompaniment will be up to his usual high standards.

Hamilton Ball says of the film that: “by adaptation and acting appropriate to pictures in motion, the least Shakespearean Hamlet becomes the best Hamlet film in the silent era”. He also quotes from a contemporary review in the periodical Exceptional Photoplays:

Rare is it indeed to see so complete a suggestion of all physical means – appearance, gesture, even the movement of an eye-lid – to the sheer art of showing forth the soul of a character as that which Asta Nielsen accomplishes in her role of Hamlet … For here is a woman whose like we have not on our own screen. Asta Nielsen’s art is a mature art that makes the curly headed girlies and painted hussies and tear-drenched mothers of most of our native film dramas as fantastic for adult consumption as a reading diet restricted to the Elsie books and Mother Goose … It is well … to put Shakespeare resolutely out of mind in seeing this production and take it on its own merits, though that is a mental feat made harder than it need have been by the frequent use of Shakespeare’s words in subtitles … Taken all in all, Hamlet reaches a level not often seen in our motion pictures.

Hamlet (1920) screens at the BFI Southbank on 27 January at 6.45pm. There are still a few tickets available here.

The Phantom of the Opera at the Royal Festival Hall, 27 March 2011

The Phantom of the Opera (1925)
The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

Carl Davis is back, with the Philharmonia Orchestra, at the Royal Festival Hall, Southbank Centre, to perform his score for The Phantom of the Opera (1925). You’ll be pleased to know that this film, which stars Lon Chaney, and the score, have nothing at all to do with Andrew Lloyd Webber.

More than 80 years after its première, Lon Chaney’s extraordinary performance as the Phantom – a crazed escapee from Devil’s Island, formerly imprisoned in a torture chamber on the site of the Paris opera – still has the power to shock; and the film is also notable for its sumptuous set-piece scenes, including a masked Ball in which the Phantom appears as the Red Death on the Grand Stairway.

The Phantom of the Opera screens at 3pm on 27 March 2011. Tickets range from £8-£38 and are available here.

The City Symphony – Part 2, Barbican, 13 March

À Propos de Nice (1929)
À Propos de Nice (1929)

Following on from February’s double-bill of Berlin, Symphony of a City and Manhatta, the Barbican brings us a triple-bill of films about French cities. The second City Symphony event comprises À Propos de Nice (Jean Vigo, 1929), Rien Que Les Heures (Alberto Cavalcanti, 1926) and Paris Qui Dort (René Clair, 1923), with piano accompaniment from Neil Brand.

Vigo’s dawn-to-dusk documentary uses montage to celebrate the vitality of Nice, but also to highlight social divides in the glamorous resort. Cavalvanti’s Paris film Rien Que Les Heures is an experimental attempt to paint a real portrait of the city, as opposed to the gloss of paintings and picture postcards. In René Clair’s surreal Paris Qui Dort, a Parisian is shocked to discover that everyone in the city has fallen into a trance – apart from him.

The City Symphony – Part 2 is on Sunday 13 March at 4pm. Tickets are available from the Barbican website and box office on 0845 120 7500. The third event in the strand, a screening of Dziga Vertov’s Man with a Movie Camera (1929), will take place on 29 May. Details to follow.

Exotic Europe, The Cinema Museum, 14 January

DURCH DIE VOGESEN [GERMANY 1911] aka THROUGH THE VOSGES MOUNTAINS
Exotic Europe
There are several interesting events lined up in the first half of the year at the Cinema Museum in Kennington. The first one to catch our eye is a screening of archive films and London Film School students’ responses called Exotic Europe. There will be a chance to see restored travelogue films from the Exotic Europe project, dating from between 1909 and 1921, and then to watch the students’ filmed responses, which they will introduce themselves. After the screenings, there will be a Q&A.

 

Exotic Europe is at the Cinema Museum on 14 January at 7pm. For more details, check out the Cinema Museum website.

Aelita: Queen of Mars and Minima at the Prince Charles Cinema

Aelita: Queen of Mars (1924)
Aelita: Queen of Mars (1924)

The February silent film at the Prince Charles Cinema in London is well worth a watch. The group Minima, who have written and performed scores for several silent films, will accompany Aelita: Queen of Mars (1924) at the PCC on 24 February. You might have seen this show at the BFI last year, but if you missed it then, this is a great opportunity.

The film is a piece of Soviet science-fiction, with fantastic constructivist sets and costumes. The hero of the film, Los, travels to Mars, where he will lead a popular revolution against the planet’s ruling class, with the help of queen Aelita, who has fallen in love with him. But all is not quite as it seems …

Minima have soundtracked Nosferatu, The Cabinet of Dr Caligari and The Lodger, among others. If you’re a fan of their scores, you might enjoy this interview with Alex Hogg from the band, in which he talks about how they set about scoring a silent film:

Films from the 1920s have a different pace, and for the uninitiated it can be hard work, so a contemporary interpretation by musicians can really help. You can make people laugh, cry and jump out of their seats but we only do this in the name of accompanying the film and helping people to watch the film.

Aelita: Queen of Mars is screened on 24 February at 8.45pm. Tickets are £10 or £6 for members and you can buy them here.

Branchage Proposes Marriage, Shoreditch Church, 12 January

His Wooden Wedding (1925) starring Charley Chase
His Wooden Wedding (1925) starring Charley Chase

Going to the chapel and we’re, gonna get mar-ar-arried … Silent London loves a good wedding, and the Branchage Proposes Marriage night in Shoreditch on Wednesday is definitely an event worthy of a new hat. This is a festival-crossover, hosted by the Branchage (pronouned Bron-carge) Film Festival as part of the London Short Film Festival. The night promises everything you would expect at a wedding: cake, a string quartet, a DJ, even Uncle Dennis (AKA comedy writer Freddy Syborn) telling jokes.

From Kusturica-esque gypsy weddings to lavish Royal Affairs; dazzling Bollywood affairs to a quickie in Las Vegas; all wedding ceremonies have their own theatricality. Branchage will be exploring the spectacular traditions and superstitious customs of weddings in an evening of silent film, performance, found footage, music and surreal wedding treats. Pull up a pew to hear something old and something new, all brought together with live-scoring from classical and contemporary folk musicians, as well as some found footage.

So, what will the film screenings be? Well, Branchage obviously doesn’t want to let the groom see the wedding dress before the big day, so they are keeping their cards close to their chest. However, they have revealed that they will be showing comedy short His Wooden Wedding (1925) directed by Leo McCarey and starring Charley Chase, accompanied by James Keay on the piano. Duo Plaster of Paris are also slated to appear “scoring a wedding vignette”, which might be found footage … or it might not.

Full details are available on the Branchage website here. Branchage Proposes Marriage is at 7pm on 12 January, at Shoreditch Church. As far I know there’s no wedding list, but tickets are £10 and they’re available from See Tickets.

The Passion of Joan of Arc at Alexandra Palace, 24 July

Well, I couldn’t be certain initially, but now all is clear. Adrian Utley from Portishead and Will Gregory from Goldfrapp will be performing their score for Dreyer’s magnificent film The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) in London this summer. The show is scheduled for Sunday 24 July 2011, as part of the I’ll Be Your Mirror festival at Alexandra Palace, which is curated by Portishead. The full lineup (such as it is, so far) is here and tickets, including single Sunday tickets (£63.15) are available here. The initial blurb for the festival promised a cinema – so would it be too much to hope that there will be further silent film screenings at the festival? Possibly.

News from Bristol: The Extra Girl, slapstick and beer

The Extra Girl (1923)
The Extra Girl (1923)

As Bristol gears up for its annual Slapstick Festival (reported on these pages elsewhere), I thought I would share with you a couple of interesting events they’ve got lined up before the main attraction, which kicks off on 28 January. First off, the Bristol Silents club is screening The Extra Girl (1923) starring Mabel Normand, on 12 January, 7.30pm at the Old Picture House. The screening is totally free and will be introduced by film historian David Robinson. Full details are available on the Bristol Silents Facebook page.

Continue reading News from Bristol: The Extra Girl, slapstick and beer

Carl Davis on Charlie Chaplin

The Gold Rush (1925)
The Gold Rush (1925)

There is an interesting article by the composer Carl Davis about Charlie Chaplin in the Guardian Review today. In the piece, he talks about how he came to piece together the original score for The Gold Rush, which he will conduct at the Royal Festival Hall on 3 January.

I was ­allowed into the vaults under the Alps near Geneva where all the materials of Chaplin’s working life are kept. There I examined the boxes containing the sketches and materials used for the 1942 revision. I found the sources of the pieces I could only guess at, as well as sketches for sequences that were in the 1925 version but cut in 1942.

Tickets for The Gold Rush are available here. Plus, for a limited time only, you can get a 20% discount if you call the box office (0844 847 9910) and quote ‘London Film Museum’.

Your last chance to see Metropolis in 2010?

Metropolis
Metropolis (1927)

Could this be the final screening of the restored, extended, reconstructed, fragrant Metropolis in London this year? Metropolis is showing at the Prince Charles Cinema, just off Leicester Square, at 8.30pm tomorrow night, ie Thursday 30 December. If you haven’t been to see Fritz Lang’s science-fiction epic this  year, and yet you have been to see Tron: Legacy, may we politely suggest that that was an error?

Metropolis screens at Prince Charles Cinema at 8.30pm on 3o December. Tickets are £6.50 or £4 for members, and they’re available here.

BFI Silents: February roundup

Lord Richard in the Pantry
Walter Forde is on the right, directing Richard Cooper in Lord Richard in the Pantry (1930)

It’s all about the archives this February at BFI Southbank. The stand-out feature for us is What Next? (1928) directed by and starring Londoner Walter Forde. Encouragingly, this film was recently discovered as a result of the BFI’s Most Wanted project, which searches for lost films. Forde, born in Lambeth in 1898, started out in musical halls before becoming a popular film comedian, then gradually moved into directing. What Next? is described as a”cheerful farce” and features a “deranged archaeologist” chasing our hapless hero around a museum at night in pursuit of a valuable Egyptian candlestick. As a bonus feature there’s a short film, Walter the Sleuth (1927). Both films are, of course, accompanied by live piano.

What Next? is screened in NFT2 on Wednesday 2 February at 6.10pm and will be introduced by a curator of the BFI archive.

There are also archival treasures to be found in the Tales From the Shipyard season, which opens with a compilation launch event on 7 February. At that event, and on 17 February as part of the A Ship is Born in Belfast programme, you can see footage from 1910 of the SS Olympic, which was the Titanic’s sister ship.

The Tales from the Shipyard launch event is on Monday 7 February in NFT1 at 6.20pm

A Ship is Born in Belfast is on Thursday 17 February in NFT2 at 8.30pm.

The most intriguing item is a talk on 19 February called The Tragic Launch of HMS Albion. Film-maker Patrick Keillor will be joined by the BFI’s Bryony Dixon, John Graves from the National Maritime Museum and London historian Chris Ellmers to discuss the terrible events of 21 June 1898. On that day, the battleship HMS Albion was christened, but as it entered the Thames, a wave caused a platform bearing spectators to collapse, and 34 people were drowned. The ship’s launch and the subsequent disaster were being filmed – so the debate will cover the ethics of documentary film-making, as well as providing historical context.

The Tragic Launch of HMS Albion is on 19 February from 11am to 4pm in NFT3 and tickets are £5

The BFI’s Tales From the Shipyard DVD will be released on 14 February.

Berlin, Symphony of a City and Manhatta at the Barbican, 6 February

Berlin, Symphony of a City
Berlin, Symphony of a City (1927)

This tale of two cities is a very cool way to spend a Sunday afternoon. The classic Berlin: Symphony of a City (1927) montage documentary directed by Walter Ruttmann is paired with a film that partly inspired it: Manhatta (1921), based on Walt Whitman’s poem Mannahatta. Both films create portraits of cities rather than character-driven narratives. It’s an idea that’s radical even now, and both of these films are beautiful works of modernism. What better to watch in the sleek 60s architecture of an arts centre in the east end of London?

Accompaniment for the films comes from the saxophone and keyboards of German group Reflektor2. The duo, Jan Kopinski and Steve Iliffe, toured the UK last year with a live score for Der Golem (1920) and have written scores for many other silent films.

Berlin, Symphony of a City and Manhatta screen at 4pm on 6 February 2011. Tickets are £10.50 full price but £8.50 online and less for concessions. They’re available here.

Metropolis at the ICA, 22 & 23 December

Metropolis
Metropolis (1927)

Christmas is coming and we all deserve a little treat, so it’s worth knowing that on two afternoons next week, the ICA is showing the new restored Metropolis. At 145 minutes long, that’s a deliciously long respite from the Christmas shopping, and the ICA is only two stops down the Bakerloo line from Oxford Circus. Can you afford not to?

Metropolis screens at the ICA on 22 and 23 December at 3.30pm. Tickets are £9 or £8 for concessions, and are available online here.

The British Silent Film Festival – April 2011

I Was Born But ... (1932)
I Was Born But ... (1932)

Consider this a teaser trailer. The British Silent Film Festival returns to the Barbican in April – and some of the screenings have already been announced. The theme is Going to the Movies: Music, Sound and the British Silent Film – no great surprise, as the festival is presented in partnership with the Sounds of Early Cinema in Britain project. As well as lectures and clip shows, five standalone film screenings are listed:

  • Beau Geste (1926)
    Hollywood director Herbert Brenon’s adaptation of the best-selling British adventure story about the Foreign Legion starring the quintessentially English Ronald Colman.
  • Twinkletoes (1926)
    US director Charles Brabin’s take on the British music hall starring Hollywood’s favourite flapper Colleen Moore.
  • Lonesome (1928)
    Paul Fejos’s brilliant part-talkie where dialogue was introduced as a novelty in this story of two lonely people trying to find love in New York. The film features a fantastic jazz-fuelled parade in Coney Island.
  • Morozko (1925)
    Yu Zhelyabuzhsky’s rarely seen Soviet fantasy about a stepdaughter who is driven out to face the spirit of winter is here presented with its original music score rediscovered and reconstructed for orchestra. Presented in conjunction with Sounds of Early Cinema Conference.
  • I Was Born But … (1932)
    Ozu’s classic family comedy marks the very end of the silent period. As one of the greatest silent films ever made, it is screened here to celebrate the artistic excellence which the silent cinema had achieved.

So, clearly the festival is not limited to British films, and with several compilation programmes, including New Discoveries in British Silent Film – there is lots to look forward to. The promise of an orchestral score for Morozko is intriguing, as is the Ozu film, which will surely be very popular. As soon as we know more, such as accompanists and individual dates, we’ll post it here. Until then, read the Bisocope’s post about the festival here, and consider your appetite well and truly whetted.

The 14th British Silent Film Festival takes place from Thursday 7 April to Sunday 10 April at the Barbican Arts Centre, London.

The Navigator at the Barbican, 9 January

Buster Keaton in The Navigator
Buster Keaton in The Navigator

The Fashion in Film festival may have departed the Barbican for another year, but the Silent Film and Live Music series is still active. That said, there’s just one screening lined up for January, but it looks like a treat. It’s a Buster Keaton double-bill of sorts, comprising The Navigator (1924), and one of his earlier, short films, Cops (1922).
Continue reading The Navigator at the Barbican, 9 January

Our Daily Bread with live score at the Roundhouse, 19 December

A still from Our Daily Bread
A still from Our Daily Bread

Not strictly a silent, this one, but we can’t help but feel it would be of interest to readers of this blog. On 19 December, one-man band Pevin Kinel will be performing a live score to the factory farming documentary Our Daily Bread at the Roundhouse in Camden.
Continue reading Our Daily Bread with live score at the Roundhouse, 19 December