Tag Archives: December 2010

Your last chance to see Metropolis in 2010?

Metropolis
Metropolis (1927)

Could this be the final screening of the restored, extended, reconstructed, fragrant Metropolis in London this year? Metropolis is showing at the Prince Charles Cinema, just off Leicester Square, at 8.30pm tomorrow night, ie Thursday 30 December. If you haven’t been to see Fritz Lang’s science-fiction epic this  year, and yet you have been to see Tron: Legacy, may we politely suggest that that was an error?

Metropolis screens at Prince Charles Cinema at 8.30pm on 3o December. Tickets are £6.50 or £4 for members, and they’re available here.

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Metropolis at the ICA, 22 & 23 December

Metropolis
Metropolis (1927)

Christmas is coming and we all deserve a little treat, so it’s worth knowing that on two afternoons next week, the ICA is showing the new restored Metropolis. At 145 minutes long, that’s a deliciously long respite from the Christmas shopping, and the ICA is only two stops down the Bakerloo line from Oxford Circus. Can you afford not to?

Metropolis screens at the ICA on 22 and 23 December at 3.30pm. Tickets are £9 or £8 for concessions, and are available online here.

Our Daily Bread with live score at the Roundhouse, 19 December

A still from Our Daily Bread
A still from Our Daily Bread

Not strictly a silent, this one, but we can’t help but feel it would be of interest to readers of this blog. On 19 December, one-man band Pevin Kinel will be performing a live score to the factory farming documentary Our Daily Bread at the Roundhouse in Camden.
Continue reading Our Daily Bread with live score at the Roundhouse, 19 December

Women Make Film History at the Women’s Library

A quick mention for this event at the Women’s Libary on Saturday, which comprises a screening of several feminist films, followed by a discussion led by a panel including Professor June Purvis and Christine Gledhill.

The screening kicks off with some silents of course: four militant suffrage comedies from 1910. Sounds great.

Tickets are £8 or £6 for concessions.

The afternoon screenings illustrate women’s relationship with the cinema through a wide range of films, moving from early suffragette films which demonstrate cinema’s role – not always complimentary – in making visible women’s political activity in the public sphere, to women’s later use of film to examine what it means to be a woman in the workplace, and finally to the flowering of women’s alternative practices using animation.

The Docks of New York at the National Gallery

This is a real one-off. Josef Von Sternberg’s The Docks of New York, starring George Bancroft and Betty Compson, screens at the National Gallery at 2.30pm tomorrow, that’s Saturday 4 December. Bancroft plays a sailor on shore leave in the Big Apple, who falls for Compson’s jaded dancer.

Fog-enshrouded cinematography by Harold Rosson (The Wizard of Oz), expressionist set design by Hans Dreier (Sunset Boulevard), and sensual performances by Bancroft and Compson make this one of the legendary director’s finest works, and one of the most exquisitely crafted films of its era.

This looks like something very special, on a weekend already jam-packed with silent screenings in London.

Tickets are £6 or £4 for concessions, but online booking has now closed – so you’ll have to get down to the gallery to get your seat.

BFI silents: December roundup

This is a good month for silent film at BFI Southbank. You can still catch the “new” Metropolis, just about, and the BFI has a full programme as part of the Fashion in Film festival, but there’s plenty more besides:

There are a couple of cartoons from the silent era in Cartoon Classics and Animated Oddities 2, 15 December.

The 1910 Show, curated by Bryony Dixon and accompanied on piano by Stephen Horne, is on Monday 13 December.

One of Fashion in Film’s six kinoscopes will be installed in the foyer until 14 December. Also during the first half of the month, you can watch, deep breath, The Red Lantern (1919), Male and Female (1919), The Affairs of Anatol (1921), Salome (1923), La Revue des Revues (1927), The Island of Love (1928), Moulin Rouge (1928) and Secrets of the East – all of which feature fabulous costumes and most of which are screened on two separate dates.